Any Microeconomic Topic Of Your Choosing – See Details Below

Course Project Overview and Description of Final Deliverables

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Course Project Description
This project is broken up into several pieces to help keep you on task. Throughout the semester you will need to turn in your choice of topics, a bibliography, an outline of the paper, a rough draft, and the final version of your paper. In addition, we’ll be doing a peer review of the drafts before turning in the finished product. The total project is worth 150 points, but each segment will be graded separately and has its own point value and rubric.

Due in Module Major Milestones / Final Deliverables Points
3 Topic Selection and Thesis Statement 13
5 Annotated Bibliography 18
7 Outline 28
9 Peer Review of Course Project 28
13 Final Project Submission 63

Your paper should be 5-10 pages in length (no less than 2000 words), thoroughly researched, and written in standard English (i.e., complete, clear, sentences, free of grammatical errors, spelling errors, etc.). For help in these areas, check out the Grammar and Mechanics section of the OWL at Purdue or contact Schoolcraft’s Writing Fellows program. The COURSE PROJECT FINAL SUBMISSION SCORING RUBRIC will be used only if your FINAL SUBMISSION meet the minimum stated above, otherwise the scoring is at my discretion.

The Sample Writing Assignment (pdf) will show you what I’m looking for. Please note that this sample is a professional publication and this complex level of formatting is not required, however please note the content. The paper should also contain the following elements:

A statement of what you intend to research.

A hypothesis about what you think you will find in the literature regarding the topic.

A review of the current literature on the chosen topic.

A summation of what other authors have written or researched regarding the topic.

Your own response detailing what you learned about the topic after researching it. For example were your original ideas about the topic confirmed by the research? If not, why?
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Topic Selection and Thesis Statement
In Module 3, you will select your topic for the course project as well as provide a thesis statement of what you intend to research.

The ability to develop a good research topic is an important skill. When deciding on a topic, there are a few things that you will need to do:

brainstorm for ideas
choose a topic that will enable you to read and understand the literature
ensure that the topic is manageable and that material is available
make a list of key words
be flexible
define your topic as a focused research question
research and read more about your topic
formulate a thesis statement
Be aware that selecting a good topic may not be easy. It must be narrow and focused enough to be interesting, yet broad enough to find adequate information. Before selecting your topic, make sure you know what your final project should look like. Be aware of the format or style of research project.

Every paper you write should have a main point, a main idea, or central message. The argument(s) you make in your paper should reflect this main idea. The sentence that captures your position on this main idea is what we call a thesis statement.

A thesis statement focuses your ideas into one or two sentences. It should present the topic of your paper and also make a comment about your position in relation to the topic. Your thesis statement should tell your reader what the paper is about and also help guide your writing and keep your argument focused.

Two examples of Topic Selection and Thesis Statement. Please follow this format.

Topic: Labor Market

Thesis Statement: The tightening job market has delivered only limited benefits to one group: the long-term unemployed. The number of people jobless six months or more may have fallen; they still represent a quarter of all those unemployed. A tepid economic recovery and post-recession caution still leads many employers to balk at hiring. Many businesses remain locked in a post-recession mindset ingrained by the downturn’s severity, and that’s adding up to long-term unemployment for workers on the sidelines for at least six months.

Topic: Asymmetric Information and Consumers

Thesis Statement: Because advertisers consciously and unconsciously manipulate data, every consumer should learn how to evaluate statistical claims.

Please save your assignment as a Word document (.doc) and upload it to the assignment area by clicking on the Browse My Computer button below the text editor. Note the file format may need to be adjusted based on the software being used for the assignment.

You forfeit any further participation in the Course Project if the Topic Selection and Statement is late or submitted in th wrong format.

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Annotated Bibliography
In Module 5, you will review three scholarly articles, books and other sources (e.g. dissertations, conference proceedings) relevant to your topic selection and write an annotated bibliography. An annotated bibliography is an organized list of sources (may be any variety of materials, books, documents, videos, articles, web sites, CD-ROMs, etc.) with an accompanying paragraph that describes, explains, and/or evaluates each entry in terms of quality, authority, and relevance. The links below provide help of how to prepare your annotated bibliography.

Elements of an Annotation

Structure of an Annotation

Examples of an Annotated Bibliography

Good research typically includes a variety of sources including scholarly materials, the popular press, documentaries, etc., – the Wilson Select Plus database is often a good starting point as is the World-Wide Web (I recommend using Google to search the web, including Google News for current events). Additionally the links below may be good starting resources. NOTE: The sources you use in completing your project need to be credible.

The Wall Street Journal
Business Week
The New York Times
The Economist
Washington Post
Financial Times
You can access the full articles for many of these magazines using the Schoolcraft College Library website. You may also want to consult the News Media resource provided by the American Economic Association.

If you need help with the search process and identification of appropriate search techniques, send an e-mail to library@schoolcraft.edu.

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Outline
In module 7, you will prepare a full sentence outline .

Writing the Sentence Outline

Write out your thesis at the top of the page.
Make a list of points you must prove to prove your thesis. What would someone have to agree with, in order to agree with the thesis?
These will be the main sections of your paper. Like the thesis, these should be complete, declarative sentences—something you can either prove or disprove.
On a new page, write your first main point. This is the thesis for that section of the paper.
Make a list of the points you have to prove to prove that point. Just as with the main points, these should be complete, declarative sentences—statements you can prove or disprove.
These are your sub-points for that section.
Repeat the process for each of your main points.
Once you have the main points and supporting points written down, it’s time to start organizing. First make sure which are main and which are supporting points. For example, you may find that what you thought was a main point is really part of proving another main point. Or, what you first listed under a main point may need its own section. This may change as you continue to work on the outline and draft the paper.

Finally, write up the outline in the order you’ve chosen. Remember to include a thesis statement at the start of the outline, and cite and list your sources.

Use the Example Full-Sentence Outline as your format.

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Peer Review
In module 9, you will be submitting the rough draft of the assignment to the discussion for review. To participate in Course Project Peer Review Discussion forums, post your rough draft no later than the due date. Participants must create an initial post of your rough draft in order to view other drafts in the forum. Failure to meet the initial rough draft post due date forfeits any farther participation in the Course Project Peer Review Discussion forum.

Everyone is expected to provide 2 positive comments and 2 suggestions for improving someone else’s rough draft. EVERYONE needs feedback, so if someone has already provided a review for a particular draft, find one that doesn’t.

Remember to provide CONSTRUCTIVE suggestions (e.g., greater attention to detail in the reference section might improve your score), NOT DESTRUCTIVE suggestions (e.g., the reference section stinks). The tone of your feedback should be collaborative and helpful. Your suggestions could include: additional content or resources, relevant examples, questions. No flaming will be tolerated!!!

Finally, you will probably find it beneficial to review the feedback provided on several of the drafts since the suggestions might also apply to YOUR paper.

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Final Submission
In Module 13, you will be submitting the final version of your paper; you need to consider the feedback you received and decide whether or not to take the advice of your peer(s). There is no penalty for NOT making use of their feedback. Your paper should be 5-10 pages in length (no less than 2000 words), thoroughly researched, written in standard English (i.e., complete, clear, sentences, free of grammatical errors, spelling errors, etc.) and in APA format. For help in these areas, check out the Grammar and Mechanics section of the OWL at Purdue or contact Schoolcraft’s Writing Fellows program. The COURSE PROJECT FINAL SUBMISSION SCORING RUBRIC will be used only if your FINAL SUBMISSION meet the minimum stated above, otherwise the scoring is at my discretion.

Be sure to run the spell check on your project and review it thoroughly before submitting it.

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